Schools and Museums: Resources

Ben Garcia. “What We Do Best”.  Journal of Museum Education, Volume 37, Number 2, Summer 2012, pp. 47-56.

  • Contentious and thought-provoking article from the Journal of Museum Education.

Kim Fortney and Beverly Sheppard, eds. An Alliance of Spirit: Museum and School Partnerships. Washington, DC: AAM Press, American Association of Museums, 2010.

  • A collection of articles about museums and schools, written with museum educators in mind.

Noguchi Museum Teacher Think Tank, “Final Report: What does success look like for a school tour at an art museum?” 2013.

Milwaukee Museum of Art website on school tours.  See in particular the Museum Manners video, the letter for school principals, and the Chaperone Responsibilities.

  • An excellent model for resources that museums might offer, and useful for teachers who are visiting almost any art museum.

Tips for teachers from Scholastic Bloggers Alycia ZimmermanBrent Vasicek, and Meghan Everette

  • Intended for a teacher audience; also useful for museum educators who want a teacher perspective on field trips.

Keri Smith, How to Be an Explorer of the World, NY: Perigree Books, 2001.

  • not strictly related to field trips to museums, or to school groups, but a nice model for independent, open-ended exploration.

Steve Seidel, Shari Tishman, Ellen Winner, Lois Hetland & Patricia Palmer. The Qualities of Quality: Understanding Excellence in Arts Education, 2009,

Denise Montgomery, Peter Rogovin & Nero Persaud. Something to Say: Success Principles for Afterschool Arts Programs From Urban Youth and Other Experts, 2013.

  • While not directly addressing visits to museums, these two reports from The Wallace Foundation are useful resources. “The Qualities of Quality” provides an excellent model for examining what matters and how to achieve it. “Something to Say” shares interviews with low-income tweens and their families, and includes principles for effective programming.

Jay P. Greene, Brian Kisida, and Daniel H. Bowen. “The Educational Value of Field Trips.” Education Next, Volume 14, Number 1, Winter 2014,

  • Thank you Rachel Ropeik for reminding me to add recent research into the value of field trips.  “The Educational Value of Field Trips” outlines research done at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, investigating the impact of field trips on critical thinking, historical empathy, factual information, interest in museums, and tolerance. One caveat: the study does not talk about Crystal Bridges’ implementation of tours. This study does NOT show that ALL museum trips achieve all or even one of these outcomes. Perhaps someone from Crystal Bridges would like to guest blog about their field trip goals and model?

Bibliography – Field Trips and Critical Thinking

  • This bibliography was created for a previous project I worked on. The Crystal Bridges work is one of the studies mentioned, but there are others.

Center for the Future of Museums, Building the Future of Education: Museums and the Learning Ecosystem

  • Findings from a 2013 convening of “policy experts, practitioners, funders, education innovators, reformers, student activists and others shaping
    the conversation about U.S. education.” Essays by various participants propose ways that museums are or could be essential to education. The publication also contains a great list of recent relevant publications.

If you have additional resources to share, please let me know and I will add them to this list.

3 thoughts on “Schools and Museums: Resources

    • Lynda – this is fantastic. Would you be willing to allow me to post some of this as its own post on Museum Questions, as part of this exploration of Schools and Museums? Credited to you, of course!

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